Falling Masses, the Big Picture.

This lecture note will make your life ten-fold easier in the scope of the problems it addresses. Consider it a talisman. I discovered this a couple of weeks ago when I was solving these problems for my own conceptual understanding. So I waited till I can completely enunciate the big picture. When I confirmed that its valid for all the following problems I made this note and sharing with you.

Wrong question in GATE 2018 physics?

I think the above question asked in GATE 2018 (physics) is wrong.

Any vector has two components. The component perpendicular to the parity axis has even parity and the parallel component to the axis has odd parity.

The opposite is true for axial vectors.

E, A vectors.
B, L axial vectors.

The correct answer per gate exam body is E, A. Why not B and L? It’s an arbitrary situation and perpendicular components of these fields will have odd parity.

Cross and Dot product of vectors.

Someone asked a very interesting question on the role of vectors in Physics. He was curious to know if dot product of vectors is natural but vector product is just syncretism, — that is make shift or unnatural manipulation.

Every vector can be resolved into two components. The cosine and sine components (any two vectors would constitute a plane) while cos part can represent the projection defined through dot PDT we can’t leave out the sine part. It plays its role through the vector or cross PDT.

The vector direction is no more along same direction as original vectors because of orthogonality. To preserve symmetry of both orthogonal components (or equal footing of both vectors, vector a and b eg) we need the 3rd dimension. Hence such a definition of cross PDT.

Eg the emf generated in a changing “mag field” (Faraday’s law) depends on change in mag field if area is held const. It also depends on change in “area vector” if mag field is held const. So there are two vectors involved and their transverse values matter (and not their longitudinal values). To preserve equivalent role of both area and mag field vectors the resultant vector must be in a 3rd orthogonal direction …

Also think of this; a scalar is not necessarily directionless. (think electric current or even temperature or heat gradient etc) They just do not have the full fledged capacity of vectors. Its like flower bud vs fully blossomed flower.

So scalars can’t be added like vectors. We tend to make a mistake here. We say scalars don’t have a direction. That’s totally erroneous. They do have direction and it matters. Which direction you want to stick to if the current flows along certain direction only?

Lets make it still more clear.

If there are two directions in which there are electric currents, we say they are both equal, the direction won’t matter. That’s where we make the mistake. We should say they are equivalent and not equal. Equality is ideal, its mathematical. But equivalence is physical. Its the effects of both currents in a certain sense that make them equivalent, but their strict equality does not follow.

Inherent ability = difficulty * accomplishment.

All of Physics is this “Inherent ability = difficulty * accomplishment”. Thats just intuitive but can easily be seen to correspond mathematically with the Principle of least action.

First the edifice: whats the problem? The problem is given you move in straight line when every direction is same around you, which direction will you chose? While you are waiting for a good answer from astrologers intelligent people already give a good hint. Think you have some inherent ability which is fixed.

fixed: which changes only if estimated wrong.

That inherent ability is actually action. Accomplishments are adjusted for difficulties, you waded through a swamp 5 meters you would have accomplished in sand 8 meters with that given inherent ability called action. Because action is abstract we have been sticking to time and path-length, but they are not as fundamental, they are merely specifics.

A c++ code for calculating pi value.

Finally I am successful in calculating pi value — less than 0.3% error, by using random number generation. Although my computer needs some fixation on its compiler or path definition etc, there are very good online compilers which helps in testing and running c++ codes: try the given link.

OUTPUT
Computing the value of pi using std::rand()
Enter number of trials: 10000
Enter number of random (x,y) points per trial: 10
pi = 3.14376 +- 0.00519107
average – exact = 0.00216735
CPU time = 0.004027 secs

Here is the code I found by searching a good deal on the web. Yes I did tinker around but only because my own compiler (Turbo C++ on windows 10, 64 bits) was throwing some exceptions on the included headers.

#include
#include
#include
#include
//#include
using namespace std;

double pi_estimate(const unsigned long points)

1 2 3 23