Falling Masses, the Big Picture.

This lecture note will make your life ten-fold easier in the scope of the problems it addresses. Consider it a talisman. I discovered this a couple of weeks ago when I was solving these problems for my own conceptual understanding. So I waited till I can completely enunciate the big picture. When I confirmed that its valid for all the following problems I made this note and sharing with you.

A c++ code for calculating pi value.

Finally I am successful in calculating pi value — less than 0.3% error, by using random number generation. Although my computer needs some fixation on its compiler or path definition etc, there are very good online compilers which helps in testing and running c++ codes: try the given link.

OUTPUT
Computing the value of pi using std::rand()
Enter number of trials: 10000
Enter number of random (x,y) points per trial: 10
pi = 3.14376 +- 0.00519107
average – exact = 0.00216735
CPU time = 0.004027 secs

Here is the code I found by searching a good deal on the web. Yes I did tinker around but only because my own compiler (Turbo C++ on windows 10, 64 bits) was throwing some exceptions on the included headers.

#include
#include
#include
#include
//#include
using namespace std;

double pi_estimate(const unsigned long points)

Addendum to Coriolis Force; Definition of Centripetal Force.

We need to understand first that Force can be categorized into two types. One is called tangential or collinear force. This component of the force is always along the direction of motion and changes speed of an object. It can change direction once the velocity of the object has become zero. Its NOT centripetal force. It can never make an object go in a plane or 3 D trajectory, as the motion is limited to only one dimension. The object can only go back and forth.

Now look at the other component. Its called a radial force. Its always perpendicular to the direction of motion. This force is called centripetal force, always. Note that its different from what we call central forces.

In consequence, both tangential and radial forces can be central.

This year’s Nobel prize in Chemistry.

What happens when some UV falls on biological molecules? (or any kind) some of these molecules like the wooden pole absorb the energy and there still remains energy which they can emit as visible light. So the UV light kicks the molecules and the molecules in turn emit visible light. This implies that the UV wavelength that the molecules absorbed energy at are very small compared to the wavelength at which they emit visible light. This is always the case.

When we say some materials are fluorescent it means they absorbed higher energy and emitted lower energy radiations of colorful light.

But this has a great deal of application apart from its theoretical interest.

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