Language

Learn a little Japanese, the words for directional reference.

This will be the last post of tonight, well, this is fast approaching morning here; 3 am here, Indian time. And this is going to be on something that is quite close to my heart, if you know me. Japanese language.

Last night I was trying to remove all the frivolous likes I had enacted over the year, 741 things to be liked, on FB, thats an awesomely large number of inconvenience for such a thing as actually liking something. So, I became crazy — thats the actual avatar that matters, and started purging off things that I really do not mean in the longer term, which is when passion is the only thing that tells me, which one and which one not, am I going to be passionately involved in something in the long run, even if it breaks the heart at times? Yes? keep it. NO? purge it.

None of the 20 some Japanese pages that I had liked actually, over the last several years, say 5-6, I deleted. Thats right they all survived from about 200 I deleted so far. Don’t take a burning sense of deprived importance and check back if I deleted something of your page, its not necessary, if you have something that I am most definitely going to be passionate about perhaps its already caught my attention. Cos as much as I know myself, I am done for this life, as far as ready get set go is concerned.

So its just that I am one man, and I have limitations.

So, here is something I want to post, on Japanese factoids.

How to ask some one in Japanese where he lives?

doko ni asundeimasu ka?

that translates ‘exactly as’ where do you live?

How does it reads phonetically? You need to know the exact way a hiragana is defined and mapped into a specific form of Roman alphabet making, called Romaji or Hepburn transliteration rule — as far as I know its only the Japanese system of language of hiragana and katakana and associated rules of the kanji reading, which employs the Hepburn system. So Romaji is an exactly matching mapping, of say hiragana alphabet.

In that system of phonetic definitions do is to be read as do in say Dorothy, but the D is not said as D in David, but as in ‘the’, if ‘the’ were to be read as ‘tho’. In a round about way, we find the phonetic. do is to be read as, ‘do’ in although.

do = though, phonetically.

Learn a little Japanese?

How to read the following in Japanese;

a’me (Ind; aa’me, ame as in rAMEn noodles) = rain. In kanji, 雨 (ame; rain)

I put ‘ to give you phonetic pauses.
o’o’ame = heavy rain
ko’sa’me = light rain
tsu’yu = rainy season
go’u’u = heavy rain
yu’u’da’sa = shower
ta’i’hu (ta’i’fu’) = typhoon.

rain
Click on image to go to original educator’s FB page.
——
ame wa futteiru; tadashii? is this correct way of writing?

——

I asked Nakano san, my scientist senior, way back in 2004-05 perhaps and thats how I knew how to say “its raining”.

Back then I didn’t know properly writing or reading Japanese. I only knew correctly how to speak, what I knew in those days.

eg man tan onegaishimasu, or juu rita ni shitte kudasai etc, or the fun; owari owari … hai dojo

Can we have only one language for the world?

Can we have only one language for the world?

See the following German words, (… and corresponding Indian words).

You would think Indo-Europian theory of language is valid. But still such a theory might be adhoc and simply a manipulation of what we see in a few instances.

In my years of analysis of words and phonetics (and alternation of elements etc) this is what I observed.

There are two categories.

The first prefers Sanskrit as a language, or even any source.

The second one prefers arbitrary factors, what I call sun theory, it can be called as a Sanskrit hypothesis, that is analysis can lead to matching + unification, but not any particular language. I am for the latter.

“I can’t believe” !

These tricks are not exclusive to Japanese alphabet. I also used them to match with Odia alphabet and south Indian alphabet to remember. Check this out !

い ଇ ಇ ఇ

The “i” [said as e, as in english] has a component which is partially same (two circles, if extrapolated) in Japanese, Odia, Kannada, Telugu. That is actually how I remembered. Even in Odia, Kannada and Telugu the “i-symbol” is same.

Check: ଦି ದಿ ది [I have written phonetics di as in “the” in Odia, Kannada and Telugu] The vowel “i” which is written as a symbol on top of the letter is same in all cases, so that helps to remember what the letter is reading. [I already know my native speak Odia, so its much easier for me to remember this way]