Sanskrit/prakrit/anyakrit

Learning Kanji with devil.

Kyuu;
The conjugated Phonetics kyu, made from Ki+Yu. Ki as in Kill. Yu as in (Y)united. Last u, as in oops if oo is to be u.

Kanji can be used to convey various meaning, in conjugation with each other. There are various categories of kanjis based on where they came from and where they get used, who is learning them

(eg a student in high school or junior level)

Based on such they can have varying degree of phonetics associated with them or a fixed multi-syllable-phonetics. In case of Japanese eg a simple unit of kanji can have 5 syllables and only that particular word of 5 syllables, associated with the kanji. eg 志; kokorozashi, is what would be called as kun-yomi, (Kun-Yomi; Japanese way of saying or reading the kanji) of the Jou-You group of kanji

Finding Chinese and Japanese language components into Indian and English words.

I have come across tons of phonetics present in Indian words (in last few years, and sometimes updated on face-book) where the first part of the Indian word is either Japanese phonetics or a Chinese phonetics with the same meaning. I am just giving an example.

(so once the elements: consonant, vowels, conjugation and slight-alternations are effectively enlisted it would be easy to word-mine, that is, just take any random word from one language and check to see another word in another languages, and which ones eg Indonesian, are the same)

And you remember (I said many times) tons of Chinese and Japanese words have been made into English. eg genuine comes from Chinese: zhēn with same meaning.

(see also Japanese yuu = ev-phonetics going into Eng: evening)

Here is one example into Indianic language: Japanese kyuu (休) = rest or break. Indic: chhu(ti) = rest or break. [chuu = kyuu phonetically b/cos of c/k/s]

A passing remark on the status of my thoughts on language theory.

So when we add asa+koro its still close to usa+kaala. That is to higher conjugated level of phonetic elements (read super-syllable-level) different language can retain the exactness of linguistic objects. A fact which makes it much more interesting to study to know exactly how different are our languages, perhaps they simply sprang from each other. That is if Japanese originated from various tracts of Chinese,so did Indian languages. The underlying conceptual pinning as exist today may be offset in this way or that way but most similarities are preserved by the nature of parentage. Also the external attributes could be offset because of place holder rules being evolved in present context but all this can be studied quite effectively.

A note about vowels in different languages.

( — The rendering is called as transliteration rules, eg if 1) a is said as a as in Apple or 2) a as in saw 3) a as in Asia or 4) a as in Daddy. They are 4 different transLIT rules hence 4 types of phonetic rendering of the same alphabetic-element a, a fact is used differently in different language. Similarly e fact is used differently, examples: e as in episode or e as in pen or e as in Pythagorean etc.)

Then a language is supposed to strictly define all these rules. In imitating English eg Indian languages have perhaps forgotten this basic notion and produced an immensely complex version of their own. There is therefore absolutely no point in objecting to use of English, anywhere. The thing that sucks about English is “they” are often not explicitly claiming that English likes to hide its rules, when English gets spoken enough the rules become clear, a fact immensely inconvenient for non-natives.