Learning a few interesting kanji.

Originally written October 2012. Explained and expanded today, 27-01-2014.

Friday, October 5, 2012 at 3:02 pm UTC + 05:30

word of the day: 体 karada and 休 kyuu 。

note 1; 亻this fellow is whats called ninben, which means “person-like part-of-a-kanji”, a part-of-a-kanji is called, a radical, which means a component of a kanji. This I have described in other kanji based articles. A composite kanji is often created from various parts, with certain rules, such as what goes, on left, what goes, on right, what on top etc, and accordingly such parts are known by 7-types of radicals or ben or hen. eg shimesuhen (礻as seen in 神). eg as you see in (体 karada and 休 kyuu, we see a; 亻) .

note 2; We also should be clear that certain rules may never have been passed explicitly. eg what caused a creation of certain kanjis. A-least to my knowledge, this is not so; so I learned kanjis, slightly more than a year ago, and now there are tons, of kanji discoveries, that is apparent rules that govern how and why these kanjis, might have been packed into a composite kanji. In-fact I have recently grown them, calling, as Kanji Equations.

This site is now filled with tons of such example, and the idea, is to share some kanji discoveries, as they happen, since that can’t follow, each time a new finding is made, a rigorous explanation from beginning, if you happen to rad kanji based findings here and understand the simple observations I have been making, pass them onto your interested networks, who might then keep track of anything they would be interested to know. In essence there would be new rules, perhaps never known, this site boasts a few of such.

Citizen Scientist. (a misleading title)

(Agility, dynamism and masculinity etc, see how I found therefore, 力 in 男 which means man or male. The latter 男, come by merging: strength 力 and sun 日, the power of the sun are what male are usually, woman’s kanji 女, called onna, jou-sei, dan-sei or jo=jiyo=jou=jiyou, they all mean ladies or feminine, comes from other reasoning, it comes from how people 人 who bond together are women, 人 + 人 = 女 )
So, while asleep, it occurred to me, 月, is 力 + 日 (the reason where, see or look/view/vision 見  is different is both 九 and 目, which are both different from 力 and 日, also note, male 男 and moon/month 月 would have looked same, with slight maladjustment, but the central part is they come from same elements, thats unification, plus when elements change slightly; eg 九 and 目, the 2ndary and tertiary meaning changes, and what we have is, 見)

How the kanji for measurement is coined in Japanese?

kanji equation; here is more progress in kanji equation, I made today.

Just came across the kanji, 測 (haka, measurement). This one looked quite familiar. (As I see now, I know tons of kanji, compared eg to last year, in an instant I would familiarize with them, so I set onto find the kanji equation and result: True that)

測; 氵+貝+刂 (sanzui+kai+rittou)
Think “catching fish in water” that entails “counting” hence “measurement.”

How to say “I” (me or mine) in Japanese; #mdashf #kanji5

How to say "I" (me or mine) in Japanese; wa'ta'shi. Note that: a real distinction between I, me or mine comes from what are called "particles". It defines; to-I, by-I, on-I, From-I etc. The few help-objects that does so (by, to, from, on, in ... ) in strictly phonetic language like Japanese or Indian languages are called as Particles. (Be rest assured particles have never been studied formally in Indianic languages, at-least as particles.) Note also that: (I have said this somewhere in last 1 year or more, wata is whats rice in Indian, written vat or bhat, that what the 1st kanji is here, its called nogi-hen or nogi part. nogi is rice, or ear of rice, which is why this kanji looks like a rice-ear, the plant-tip. shi is like ji or shri. It could be that rice just denotes the Lord, farmer, owner etc. Nose then gives the human depiction. I or me to be known as "I who eats this rice" or "I who owns this rice" etc)

Learning Kanji with devil.

Kyuu; The conjugated Phonetics kyu, made from Ki+Yu. Ki as in Kill. Yu as in (Y)united. Last u, as in oops if oo is to be u. Kanji can be used to convey various meaning, in conjugation with each other. There are various categories of kanjis based on where they came from and where they get used, who is learning them (eg a student in high school or junior level) Based on such they can have varying degree of phonetics associated with them or a fixed multi-syllable-phonetics. In case of Japanese eg a simple unit of kanji can have 5 syllables and only that particular word of 5 syllables, associated with the kanji. eg 志; kokorozashi, is what would be called as kun-yomi, (Kun-Yomi; Japanese way of saying or reading the kanji) of the Jou-You group of kanji