Fresnel’s Bi-prism: measurement of wavelength of light. Reply

Optics Series Lecture, Lecture – XI.

“Fresnel’s Bi-prism: measurement of wavelength of light by it.” This lecture was delivered on 16th February in a lecture session of 1 and 1/2 hours. This lecture was delivered to Physics elective students and later to honors students. This does not strictly pertain to 1 and 1/2 hours of regular lecturing session that we have mostly been employing. Thats because it was created with another part which can be optionally appended to other related subject matter. In the web-version thats what we will do. Our guiding principle is more in line with the honors course, where the subject matter is quite extensive and deep which brings more flexibility and choices into the lecture compositions.

Today we will discuss another interesting interference set-up, now that we have discussed the Young’s double slit experiment, in lecture – IX. A few words about the general mechanism behind interference. There are two kinds of interference basically that we will be discussing in our lectures. We discussed the Young’s DS interference pattern based on our understandings of intensity or irradiance patterns that we studied here: lecture – VII. Interference is sustained and visible if the corresponding sources of light are coherent among themselves, that is, if the sources have phase differences that are not arbitrarily or abruptly changing, as a consequence we can safely assume the phase differences are constant and therefore predictable. Incoherent light makes this impossible. Incoherent light is that light source whose production itself is arbitrary and abrupt and unpredictable, hence nothing can be definitively said on its phase, as a result the coherence is only short lived. If two light sources are so generated that their respective coherence time (or coherence length) are well within each others span, they are said to be coherent light. More…

Young’s Double Slit Experiment. 1

Optics Series Lecture, Lecture – IX.

“Young’s Double Slit Experiment. Coherent Sources and Conditions of Interference” This lecture was delivered on 14th February in a lecture session of 1 and 1/2 hours. This lecture was delivered to Physics elective students. At a later date this is intended as a lecture to honors students as well. The web-version differs slightly from class delivered lectures, in that: any particular idea is explained without reference to what level it must cater to. That means in class lecture will modulate depending on the actual level of student body and their response. An honors student body who would find a particular discourse difficult will be supplied with further simplified versions of the concepts, verbatim. An elective students body which is well prepared would have no problems grasping the fundamentals at a purported level. Its a happy scenario if that is indeed the case.

The concurrent lecture is particularly divided into two parts. The first part pertains to what are coherent sources and what are the sustainable conditions for interference, for such to be observed. The second part leads us to describe in requisite detail the phenomenon of Young’s double slit interference. Note that we have already discussed the phenomenon of interference in our lecture-VII, which was delivered to honors students. We will only passively mention that there are two kinds of interference the so called wave-front-splitting and the amplitude splitting interference. Later on we will discuss any required details of both kinds. Before we do so we will have several interference phenomenon lectures from both types. Young’s double slit interference is an example of the wave-front splitting interference. What happens here is there are two primary or secondary coherent sources and two separate waves interfere at a given observation vantage. Another example of wave-front splitting interference is Fresnel’s bi-prism set-up which we will study soon, in an imminent lecture. For amplitude splitting interference only one wave produces the interference patterns, because the wave amplitude is partially reflected and partially transmitted — or refracted, and both channels meet up somewhere. More…

Interference of two plane harmonic waves. 5

Optics Series Lecture, Lecture – VII.

“Conditions of interference, Interference of two plane harmonic waves.” This lecture was delivered on 7th February in a lecture session of 1 and 1/2 hours. This lecture was delivered to Physics elective students but intended as a lecture towards Honors students at a later date.

Electromagnetic Waves.

Light is an electromagnetic wave. In-fact its a transverse electromagnetic wave which means the oscillation of E and B fields produces light which propagates in a direction that is perpendicular to the plane that contains the E and B fields. In other words E, B and k the vector that denotes the direction of light propagation, are mutually perpendicular vectors. We will study these details in a later intended lecture. EM waves are not only transverse waves but also vector waves, that is; E and B are vector fields whose undulation is summarized as light.

Light is a general name for all EM waves but visible light is that particular part of EM waves which has frequency of wave such that the wavelength varies from approximately 400 – 700 nm. In vacuum — only in vacuum, light always moves at a fixed speed: namely 3×108 m/s. Therefore light whose wavelength lies between 400 – 700 nm is called as visible light: we can write in vacuum c = νλ.

Light as a transverse wave phenomenon of vector fields is comprehensively described by four equations known as Maxwell’s Equations. More…

Physics class tests, XII/ICSE/CBSE Reply

3. Why Ka and Kb lines are produced (chose only one appropriate answer)

A. electronic transitions B. Atomic collisions

C. Radioactive decay D. Nuclear transmutation

4. Exactly why there is quantization of physical variables such as momentum, angular momentum, energy, orbital distance and speed?

A. wave-particle duality B. Interference of waves

C. Particle acceleration to speed of light D. Resistance experienced by particles in conductors

5. Cathode rays are streams of

A. electrons B. x-rays

C. nucleons D. high atomic number elements More…