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The origin of the word “nemesis” ..

also see the slight difference in shichi [7七] and the symbol in 死. The latter is used as a symbol for person asif one is sitting. 7七 is used anywhere there is nature’s elements present: eg 花hana=flower、脂abura=fat/oil、 指yubi=finger. One might be tempted to say in finger and fat the “sitting person is used” although my opinion is just think “7” = 7 elements of nature. Also note how English: 7 is a upside down Japanese [7七].

read more The origin of the word “nemesis” ..

Languages like English/Indian in modern times derived vastly from Chinese/Japanese

This means 5 elements were stolen from Chinese system. The Chinese 7 system is amply evidenced in Japanese culture, eg 7 layered Pagoda. Also this analysis is remarkable: 七+名=死, which says shichi+mei = shi, 7 + name = death. Once a person has met its 7 [七] elements [person = name 名] its death. death is shi which goes into Indian words: shesh. But note the mouth [square on 名] is missing in 死 because nomore the person’s namesake will be in use. This shichi = 7 is the origin of words shiven, shipat [seven English and sapta Indian]. Also you will find 七 in words which denote natural elements, eg hana 花 and abura 脂. [flower and fat]

read more Languages like English/Indian in modern times derived vastly from Chinese/Japanese

How to recognize words in various languages … a magic formula

1. the languages are “read” into Roman. Roman without any particular rules not defined is arbitrary. That is it becomes neutral, devoid of biases from language rules. It unlocks the languages into their neutral forms.

The languages are basically a rule or lock defined to capture particular meanings from a vast arbitrary tract of phonetics and noise. eg roman: t corresponds to 4 locks in Indian Language system and two locks in Japanese. t as in tatami, t as in taberu are the soft t and heavy t in Japanese. But in Indian t as in tumhara, t as in tenis, t as in thoda and t as in beithak are 4 different locks, 2 soft and 2 heavy.

But in Roman they are all but t. Note that English is not Roman. English is simply a hidden phonetics where you know what the lock is, but you do not show it explicitly. eg time is English, but in Indian lock its thaim, with t in thaim same as the t locked in beithak.

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10-incarnations [da-s-avatara] in Sanskrut and Japanese

Note how close the 10-incarnations of Bishnu = Narayana= Nara, are in Indian and Japanese. they retain at-least one monosyllable or more, which could mean the 10-incarnation system was developed much later and is a compilation from philosiphical and mythical school of thoughts prevalent up until now, but thesame linguistic system existed much before. I took this project 30 min ago and done.

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Indian languages are monosyllabic contrary to whats known

In-fact this I have realized year or two before and few things were written in this website in teh last 1-2 years in this regard. And here is why Indian language has to be monosyllabic. 1. India is in Asia and almost all major countries through ages have monosyllabic nature. eg Chinese is monosyllabic and its present in major nations of Asia including Japan where the latter is very-well clsoe in the spoken words. There are many example, the last article: “kyomizu dera” is perhaps simply so in Indian as well “khyamisu dera” with recognition that “khyamisu = forgiving God”

read more Indian languages are monosyllabic contrary to whats known